Kehr’s Weekly Recap: The Blue Dahlia (1946)

The Blue Dahlia (1946)

Underneath this Veronica LakeAlan Ladd thriller (1946) lies Raymond Chandler‘s only original screenplay—a suitably hard-nosed affair about a war vet whose homecoming coincides with the murder of his unfaithful wife. Though it has the Chandler flavor and occasionally captures the feel of his sunbaked Los Angeles, the film falters under the uncertain, visually uninventive direction of George Marshall—wildly miscast here, when any vaguely sympathetic hack from Stuart Heisler to Frank Tuttle would have been just fine. With William Bendix and Howard da Silva.

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Kehr’s Weekly Recap: The Black Cat (1934)

The Black Cat (1934)

This 1934 Boris KarloffBela Lugosi vehicle became a classic of Hollywood expressionism under the direction of Edgar G. Ulmer, a German emigre who once worked as an assistant to F.W. Murnau. Ulmer never again had the budgetary resources granted him by Universal (at the time, Karloff and Lugosi were two of the studio’s biggest stars), and he makes the most of them. The sets, designed mostly by Ulmer himself, combine Bauhaus stylings with the bottomless shadows of the German silents, providing a studiously unreal background for a bizarre power struggle between the two stars. Karloff, a tremendously underrated film actor, has one of his best, most extravagant roles; Lugosi has one of his last good ones. With David Manners and Jacqueline Wells cringing in the corners.

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