Kehr’s Weekly Recap: While The City Sleeps (1956)

While The City Sleeps (1956)

Fritz Lang‘s 1956 film was one of his personal favorites, a taste shared by few critics at the time, who never forgave him for leaving Germany and Die Nibelungen. A contest is announced at a New York newspaper: the reporter who catches the notorious “Lipstick Killer” will become the paper’s new editor. The story is a cynical twist on Lang’s famous M: the sex killer becomes the most sympathetic character in the film, as Lang reserves his venom for the desperately competitive reporters, including Dana Andrews, Thomas Mitchell, Ida Lupino, and George Sanders. 100 min.

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Kehr Capsule of the Week: Pocketful of Miracles (1961)

Frank Capra‘s last film (1961) is a remake of his 1933 Lady for a Day, about a bunch of lovable gangsters who pitch in to help an elderly apple seller (Bette Davis) convince her long-lost daughter that she’s a queen of New York society. Capra’s powers as a cunning audience manipulator largely deserted him after World War II, when—with the glorious exception of It’s a Wonderful Life—he seemed to lose faith in the sentimental fables he told. This lumpy and depressing farewell film measures the extent of his fall from conviction; not a moment in it rings true. With Glenn Ford, Hope Lange, Peter Falk, and an amazing collection of aging character actors, including Edward Everett Horton, Thomas Mitchell, Sheldon Leonard, Jerome Cowan, Fritz Feld, and Barton MacLane. 136 min.

Kehr Capsule of the Week: Gone with the Wind (1939)

A critic-proof movie if there ever was one: it isn’t all that good, but somehow it’s great. The first part, in which the gracefully moving camera of George Cukor (soon to be replaced) establishes the ordered world of Tara in elegant visual terms, is really very fine. But the last half is all slow, desultory denouement, and the death of the little girl is the dirtiest kind of screenwriter’s trick. No one I know of has yet solved the secret of this 1939 film’s apparently timeless appeal, though I’d guess it has something to do with the elaborate mechanisms of fate, history, and sex brought to bear on Scarlett, whose overweening libido must be punished as magnificently as it has been celebrated. The striking color overlays, which are the film’s sole stylistic eccentricity, were the contribution of that cryptic auteur, production designer William Cameron Menzies. Victor Fleming signed it, though there were many, many fingers in this particular pie. 222 min.

Kehr Capsule of the Week: It’s a Wonderful Life (1946)

The film Frank Capra was born to make. This 1946 release marked his return to features after four years of turning out propaganda films for the government, and Capra poured his heart and soul into it. James Stewart stars as a small-town nobody, on the brink of suicide, who believes his life is worthless. Guardian angel Henry Travers shows him how wrong he is by letting Stewart see what would have happened had he never been born. Wonderfully drawn and acted by a superb cast (Donna Reed, Beulah Bondi, Thomas Mitchell, Lionel Barrymore, Gloria Grahame) and told with a sense of image and metaphor (the use of water is especially elegant) that appears in no other Capra film. The epiphany of movie sentiment and a transcendent experience.